How enterprise training is the secret ingredient of your company’s success

#employee training #enterprise training #online courses

Kat Amato

It has commonly been said:

Good things come to those who wait.

It might be a good idea when your business is not doing good. But this thought might also cause you to relax and not focus on factors that might trigger your growth. For those of you, who don’t agree to it, there’s another one that will surely suit your attitude.

Good things come to those who get up and work for it.

It proves to be more true in the business world. Likewise, when it comes to enhancing your company’s success, the role enterprise training plays is unparalleled. The incentive enterprise training sparks for innovation is something that should be harnessed in every company, and is sure to yield positive repercussions.

Your business is as good as your employees

A major temptation for businesses, both new and seasoned, is to stick to what works. While finding a niche for business fundamentals is key, becoming complacent in company techniques and size is detrimental to company growth and success. It is essential for companies to continue to grow, learn, and expand for many reasons. First and foremost, becoming complacent as a company makes your business progress stagnant.

While companies become comfortable in their success and standards, their competitors are continuing to work hard. For companies to stop thinking outside of their normal perimeters is for them to let other businesses pass them. Additionally, it is important for businesses to continue to grow and strive in order to keep the passion for their livelihood.

Employees who feel their work is compelling and meaningful are not only more loyal to their company, but invest more effort and enthusiasm in their work. It is these kind of employees that drive companies to significant success. The power of enterprise training is what pushes companies to the next level.

How world’s best companies feel about enterprise training

Howard Edward Haller, management consultant Gifford Pinchot III and the great Steve Jobs back in the early­to­mid 1980s, created a term for this shift within companies; from stagnant in success to enterprise experts. Haller encouraged business to shift from being intrepreneurial to entrepreneurial. That is, making the shift from focusing too much inwards on business, but continually looking outward to what the market could use from them. Additionally, this form of enterprising begs the essential question how, “What can our company do that our competitors cannot?”

Here are a list of big companies who are known for the best employees, to see if they sound familiar:

Mac, iPod, iTunes, iPhone, iCloud inside of Apple

Gmail, Google News, AdSense, driverless cars, Google Glass and other innovations inside of Google

The numerous divisions launched by Virgin: Air, hotel, casino, books, music, Megastore, mobile, wines, games, Galactic

PlayStation inside of Sony

Saturn inside of General Motors

Post­It Notes inside of 3M

Elixir Guitar Strings inside of W.L. Gore (makers of GoreTex)

SkunkWorks fighter jet project inside of Lockheed Aircraft

Java programming language inside of Sun Microsystems

Digital Light Processing technology inside of Texas Instruments

What do all these companies have in common, besides their notable success?

Each of these businesses have implemented an enterprise training mindset within their structure. For example, a certain percentage of these employee’s work hours are dedicated to innovative thinking, including brainstorming concepts and ideas outside of their job descriptions.

Regardless of where they are professionally, from intern to CEO, each member has designated time to think outside of the box. This enterprise forward structure prepares the mindsets of every company member for the consequential entrepreneurial success.

Leaders of companies and businesses play a major role in cultivating this mindset within their fellow colleagues. By encouraging those working under them to explore ideas for the company, they create a space for enterprising. Employees can often hesitate to think out of the box due to fear.

Many become stagnant due to the risk of failure, punishment, or other negative repercussions that can be tied to stepping outside of the norm. As a leader, the opportunity to silence those fears and challenge colleagues to engage in enterprising can cause a shift within the whole company. It is being mindful of that power and privilege that causes a leader to take their team to the next level.

In order to implement this shift successfully, the company’s mindset must be more focused on what the company’s goals are for the next 10 years, rather than next week. This futuristic mindset harbors enterprising in the workplace, and keeps the big picture in focus. By focusing on the company’s long term goals and missions, the possibility of resting stagnantly decreases immensely.

Remember people with an entrepreneurial mind­set are different from those with a more corporate outlook. So if you want to create an environment where entrepreneurs can operate at their very best, try to manage and lead them appropriately.

Joe Bascall, CEO and Co­Founder of Geneca

With these truths in mind, your business is sure to reap the benefits of enterprise training within the company.