3 body language tips to improve salesperson and make more sales

#language #sales

Kathy Amato

‘It’s not what you said, it’s how you said it.’ How often have we heard that line in films, in songs, in relationships? Cliches exist for a reason, because they are so true their presence is overused, abused, and reused. But right now, we’re here to talk about body language and how it’s affecting your sales, right?

The media thrives on the use of body language to manipulate its viewers to consume the product being promoted. Advertisement agencies are dependent on the science of psychology. Their job is to figure out how to make people want to buy more. Body language, believe it or not, is a leading topic in advertisement agencies.

We’re going to give you 3 tips on what to do and what not to do in order to increase sales for your company. After all, experts claim that up to 90% of our communication is non-verbal. Who would’ve thought?

So here comes Tip Number 1 and it’s starts with the head, well at least the face.

Muscles in the face are so telling. The facial expressions your sales agents make when pitching offers can make or break the whole deal. For one thing, according to Scienceofpeople.com, “If we see a confused or frustrated face in an ad, we tend to copy the face and therefore feel more confused or frustrated ourselves.”(http://www.scienceofpeople.com/2013/08/5-ways-body-language-is-used-in-advertising/) So, if your sales agent gives off any doubtful or insecure expressions while he or she is trying to make a sale, this will subconsciously transfer a doubtful and insecure feeling into the buyers. Well that sort of defeats the whole purpose of their job now, doesn’t it?

So make sure your salesperson confidently believe in what they are selling, because their security will shine through in their demeanor.

Okay, ready for Tip Number 2? We’re going to move down to the shoulders neck and chest.

When people seem relaxed and easy going this makes everyone around them feel more relaxed and easy going. Consequently, when someone is tense and uptight, this will naturally make the surrounding people feel tense and uptight.

What does the right body language actually look like? Well according to Changingminds.Org, “Clear body language is relaxed and precise, without being held in or under control. It supports speech, for example in emphasizing key points, and never contradicts it. It does not include unnecessary movement which may cause confusion or betray nervousness.”(http://changingminds.org/disciplines/sales/articles/sales_body_language.htm)

We want to match the body language of our consumers. Make them feel as an equal. This sense of equality will give a sense of companionship, which will lead to trust.

When your salesperson greets a buyer in the office, it’s a nice move to greet the buyer, walk with them to their seats, and take a seat together in the same moment. This shows that everyone is moving at the same pace, and subsequently with similar goals, in a similar direction.

This simultaneity creates a bond, and therefore, a trust between the seller and the buyer.

Then there’s the slouched shoulder. Not too attractive. I mean we don’t all have to look like supermodels walking down a runway, at all times, but there is something to it. The intentions are to exude confidence. If your sales agents look confident, then the buyers will trust their word more. When a sales agent looks weak and unsure it’s less attractive, and less trustworthy. No matter how practical and intelligible the sales pitch is, if it’s delivered in a weak tone and posture, the whole concept gets weakened and dampened.

Lastly, Tip Number 3, be ware of the hands.

It’s important for your salesperson to be aware of their hand gestures. Keeping your arms crossed over your chest comes across as defensive and closed. If you want your costumes to feel open to new ideas and purchases then it’s important for your salesperson to reflect that same message.

Make sure your agents are aware of what they are doing with their hands when selling ideas and merchandise. Tapping or twirling pens, erasers, office supplies, comes across as impatient and rude.

It comes also highly recommended to keep the hands out and open.

Hiding hands in pockets or under the desk, or any other imagined hiding spot can come across as disengaged or untrustworthy. Open visible palms send a friendly and receptive message. We all know what a tight fist looks like. There are no friendly messages clenched inside those closed palms.

It’s important to remember, as author of The Silent Language of Leaders: How body language Can Help, Dr. Carol Kinsey Goman writes, “Your gestures, voice tone, rate, and volume can all have a profound effect on the success of your negotiations, job interviews, and sales meetings.” Believe us, these are no small gestures to overlook.